We wish you every blessing of Christmas

All in the Tertianship wish you a happy Christmas and every blessing in 2012.

In the Spiritual Exercises we are invited by Saint Ignatius to visualise and engage with the nativity scene, the better to understand the incarnation and to grow closer to Jesus:

See, with the eyes of the imagination, the people, that is to say Our Lady, and Saint Joseph, and the servant girl, and the child Jesus after his birth. Making myself into a poor and unworthy little servant, I watch them, and contemplate them, and serve them in their needs as if I were present, with all possible submission and reverence: and afterwards I reflect within myself to derive some profit.

Homily for the day after the end of the Long Retreat


“Coming out of the Long Retreat”

Coming out of the long retreat has something to do with going to an encounter. We have been alone during a long time, we have been dwelling in our thoughts for thirty days. We may have experienced very personal joys or very personal sorrows which nobody but Jesus would be able to listen. Coming out of a retreat is making new relations, is connecting with people you’ve not seen for a long time and which have changed possibly as much as you have changed yourself. Coming out of a retreat may look like this mornings when you feel it’s better to switch off your alarm clock and to sleep a extra hour, better than wake up and meet your fellow companions.

Whenever such sluggish thoughts come to your mind, look at how the beloved one’s have no harm to come out of their houses and to encounter each other. How they peer the voice of each other. How they look in and out at the window. How one stands behind the wall until the other comes fourth. See then how the Beloved address you painting a lovely world and saying :

“Winter is past, rains are over and gone
Flowers appears on the earth, the season of glad songs has come,
The cooing off the turtle dove is heard in our land”

(Song, 2;12).

 

Which one of us hearing such a voice, the same voice he heard within him in the midst of the Exercises, would not jump out of his bed at the encounter of his friends?

Which one of us at such a personal call to “come” and to “show (his) face” (Son, 2; 13-14) would not leap on the mountains and bound over the hills as Mary did when she came to Elizabeth (Lk;1,39).

Which one of us with such a personal hint of the presence of the Beloved would not acknowledge this with gratitude leaping on himself in the very deepness of his womb?

 

This is  what we are about to live now and in the coming days

“asking for interior knowledge of all the good I have received so that acknowledging this with gratitude, I may be able to love and serve His Divine Majesty in everything”

(Ad Amorem, Spirituals Exercises, n°233).

Be our Eucharist a living encounter with the Beloved, be our coming out of the retreat a living Eucharist in the world.

Based upon Song 2:8-14 / Lk 1:39-45

The Spiritual Exercises – conclusion

Jesuit Paul Coutinho is the author of How Big Is Your God? The Freedom to Experience the Divine and writes about ‘The Contemplation to Attain Love’ – a final element of the Spiritual Exercises.

The first step in this exercise is to recall the gifts of your life: your birth, baptism, family, children, redemption, grace, qualities, and talents—anything and everything you have to be grateful for. In gratitude for these gifts that God has given you—and that includes the Divine himself—you offer it all, including yourself, back to God.

Continue reading on Ignatian Spirituality where you will also find other articles about the Spiritual Exercises

Ignatius of Loyola wrote the Spiritual Exercises once he had found that certain meditations and contemplations–“Exercises”–were helpful to others in coming to a clearer image of God, themselves and their place in the world. While the text is widely published, the Exercises are a more a set of “director’s notes” used to guide a person during a month-long retreat than a text to be read alone. The ‘weeks’ described in the Exercises refer to the four main phases.

Every Jesuit does the Spiritual Exercises during his initial training and again during Tertianship. Please pray for the Tertians in Dublin who will be doing the exercises from 19 November to 20 December.


The Spiritual Exercises – the fourth week

During this week we are asked to bring the encounters of the Risen Jesus with the disciples to focus in our prayer.  We do this so that we can more clearly see how it is that we, in our  ordinary lives,  can meet with Jesus and recognise his presence.  We seek to draw strength, consolation and hope from Jesus presents to us, the better that we may inspire and encourage others in our ministry.

See Ignatian Spirituality for more about the Spiritual Exercises

Ignatius of Loyola wrote the Spiritual Exercises once he had found that certain meditations and contemplations–“Exercises”–were helpful to others in coming to a clearer image of God, themselves and their place in the world. While the text is widely published, the Exercises are a more a set of “director’s notes” used to guide a person during a month-long retreat than a text to be read alone. The ‘weeks’ described in the Exercises refer to the four main phases.

Every Jesuit does the Spiritual Exercises during his initial training and again during Tertianship. Please pray for the Tertians in Dublin who will be doing the exercises from 19 November to 20 December.


The Spiritual Exercises – the third week

The third week of the Exercises draws us into union with Christ. We come to realise that to follow Christ is to be united with him, not just on the road of discipleship, but in his suffering and death. We pray not only that we have deep sorrow for sin, but that we have deeper compassion for the world in which God still suffers. Even in the shadow of the cross, we pray that we may discover a joy in being united with Jesus. We pray for a deeper desire to live our lives fully in response to God’s love.

See Ignatian Spirituality for more about the Spiritual Exercises

Ignatius of Loyola wrote the Spiritual Exercises once he had found that certain meditations and contemplations–“Exercises”–were helpful to others in coming to a clearer image of God, themselves and their place in the world. While the text is widely published, the Exercises are more a set of “director’s notes” used to guide a person during a month-long retreat than a text to be read alone.  The ‘weeks’ described in the Exercises refer to the four main phases.

Every Jesuit does the Spiritual Exercises during his initial training and again during Tertianship. Please pray for the Tertians in Dublin who will be doing the exercises from 19 November to 20 December.